Blog by Little Red Stuga / www.littleredstuga.se/blog
Photos: Katsuhisa Kida
Breaking rules.When we first started to work with design for pedagogical environments it was obvious that it wasn’t just the interior that lacked inspiration and playfulness but most often the whole building and environment. 
Sadly not much has happened on the design or architecture front since the 70’s on this area. A majority of the preschool’s are still standard barack solutions, which bears traces from the time when they were a solution of storage and nursery of children when women were to be passed out to working life. But new tendences are seen and new visions on how these buildings should be designed emerge. All of the sudden it seems like a preschool is the new prestige work for architects, often built on pedagogical ideas inspired from Reggio Emilia or Montessori. And of course children must be the best users of architecture, as they explore space with their whole body’s and experience with all the senses; moving around, crawling on the ground, climbing on walls, running - playing. It makes me so happy to see new examples, that will bring the development forward and set a new standard for how we view preschool’s as pedagogical spaces for development, challenges and play. Showing you images of Fuji Kindergarten outside Tokyo, a house without dead ends, by Tezuka Architects. Look at that roof! What a thrill it must be to be able to run free up there, and climbing trees that burst through the house. A house that really breaks the rules of conventional ideas. You can listen to an audio review of this house at Monocle.

Photos: Katsuhisa Kida

Breaking rules.

When we first started to work with design for pedagogical environments it was obvious that it wasn’t just the interior that lacked inspiration and playfulness but most often the whole building and environment. 


Sadly not much has happened on the design or architecture front since the 70’s on this area. A majority of the preschool’s are still standard barack solutions, which bears traces from the time when they were a solution of storage and nursery of children when women were to be passed out to working life. But new tendences are seen and new visions on how these buildings should be designed emerge. All of the sudden it seems like a preschool is the new prestige work for architects, often built on pedagogical ideas inspired from Reggio Emilia or Montessori. And of course children must be the best users of architecture, as they explore space with their whole body’s and experience with all the senses; moving around, crawling on the ground, climbing on walls, running - playing. 

It makes me so happy to see new examples, that will bring the development forward and set a new standard for how we view preschool’s as pedagogical spaces for development, challenges and play. Showing you images of Fuji Kindergarten outside Tokyo, a house without dead ends, by Tezuka Architects. Look at that roof! What a thrill it must be to be able to run free up there, and climbing trees that burst through the house. A house that really breaks the rules of conventional ideas. 

You can listen to an audio review of this house at Monocle.