Blog by Little Red Stuga / www.littleredstuga.se/blog
Skolgård.När barn får frågan och förtroendet har de mycket att säga om sin skolgårdsmiljö - vad som skulle göra den roligare och bättre. Vi hade workshop igår med en grupp första och fjärdeklassare, som fick fria händer att planera om sin skolgård. Och vilka resultat! Alltifrån visioner om nya och förbättrade ytor, utveckling av befintliga lekredskap och förslag på konkreta saker som saknas. Något som slog oss är att det är rätt enkla saker som barnen efterfrågar - mer grönska, stänger och enklare klätterställningar, mer färg och varierade ytor. Hanna hade en hel idé på hur man kunde bygga om ett sandlådeskepp så att det gick att klättra i. Att klättra ligger högt i kurs hos barnen. Barn vill röra på sig, varför motarbeta det som sätter grunden för hälsa och välbefinnande genom att dra ner på kvaliteten och storleken på skolgården?
Workshopen var en del av ett pilotprojeket, Ada Lab, där vi medverkar som du kan läsa mer om här. 
When children are asked they have much to say about their schoolyard environment - what would make it better and more fun. We had a workshop yesterday with a group of first and fourth graders who got free hands to vision about their school playground. And what results! From visions of new and improved surfaces, development of existing play equipment and proposals for concrete things that are missing. Something that struck us is that it is quite simple things that kids ask for - more greenery, climbing equipment, more colorful and varied surfaces. Hanna had a great idea on how to build a sandbox-ship so that it was possible to climb in. Climbing is a big thing with the kids. Children want to move, why oppose it that sets the foundation for health and wellbeing by reducing the quality and size of the school yard?
The workshop was part of a pilot project, Ada Lab, that we are involved in. 

Skolgård.
När barn får frågan och förtroendet har de mycket att säga om sin skolgårdsmiljö - vad som skulle göra den roligare och bättre. Vi hade workshop igår med en grupp första och fjärdeklassare, som fick fria händer att planera om sin skolgård. Och vilka resultat! Alltifrån visioner om nya och förbättrade ytor, utveckling av befintliga lekredskap och förslag på konkreta saker som saknas. Något som slog oss är att det är rätt enkla saker som barnen efterfrågar - mer grönska, stänger och enklare klätterställningar, mer färg och varierade ytor. Hanna hade en hel idé på hur man kunde bygga om ett sandlådeskepp så att det gick att klättra i. Att klättra ligger högt i kurs hos barnen. Barn vill röra på sig, varför motarbeta det som sätter grunden för hälsa och välbefinnande genom att dra ner på kvaliteten och storleken på skolgården?

Workshopen var en del av ett pilotprojeket, Ada Lab, där vi medverkar som du kan läsa mer om här

When children are asked they have much to say about their schoolyard environment - what would make it better and more fun. We had a workshop yesterday with a group of first and fourth graders who got free hands to vision about their school playground. And what results! From visions of new and improved surfaces, development of existing play equipment and proposals for concrete things that are missing. Something that struck us is that it is quite simple things that kids ask for - more greenery, climbing equipment, more colorful and varied surfaces. Hanna had a great idea on how to build a sandbox-ship so that it was possible to climb in. Climbing is a big thing with the kids. Children want to move, why oppose it that sets the foundation for health and wellbeing by reducing the quality and size of the school yard?

The workshop was part of a pilot project, Ada Lab, that we are involved in. 

All images ©2012 Tham & Videgård Arkitekter
Color Exposion. 
A while ago I visited the new built preschool Paletten (Palette in english) at Telefonplan outside Stockholm. A color explosion and energy kick inside-out by

Tham & Videgård Arkitekter. I’ve followed this project with great interest as it’s unusual with this kind of preschool buildings.I met up with Cecilia Hjelm, preschool chief, and she gave me a tour, something she’s quite used to. The building arouses much interest, mostly from architects that visit Paletten in study purpuse.The sections are color coded – pink, green and blue with yellow windows. When I’m there children run freely in the joint central room, in between draperies that create new rooms in the room. I follow one girl through one of the doors that leads to one of the private rooms. Each group has their own. I can’t help reflect on what relationship to color and space this girl will grow up to have.
In the latest issue of Arkitektur, a journalist made a review of Paletten, which I felt got lost as the sentence of;  …”Color is an inexpensive way to achieve strong effects, but when the walls are curved and the inner wall undulates in a different direction, while the windows jump up and down, together with all the children, toys, artwork, etc. it becomes a bit much of everything.”(…”Färg är ett billigt sätt att uppnå starka effekter men när ytterväggar är svängda och innerväggarna böljar åt ett annat håll, samtidigt som fönsterställningen hoppar upp och ner, ihop med alla dagisbarn, leksaker, teckningar osv blir det lite mycket av allt.”)I would like to celebrate that the architects dared to stretch the limits for what is expected and letting pedagogical ideas form the shape together with their love for color. Not only does the pedagogues go to work with a smile on their face, Cecilia also told me she’s never in her 30 years-something preschool worklife worked at a place where there has been so little conflicts among both workers and children.! This is what it’s all about really – creating environments for people to enjoy and feel good in, supporting the activity the object or house is created for – and should more often take part of the debates and discussions. In this case the curved walls creates – together with the materials – a pleasant sound environment that decreases stress on the children and encourage movement. The changing window heights creates a diversity in the outside scenes and views for the children. And the children, well they unconditionally belong there together with their toys and artwork.  Read more about Paletten at the architects website and here.
All images ©2012 Tham & Videgård Arkitekter

Color Exposion.
 
A while ago I visited the new built preschool Paletten (Palette in english) at Telefonplan outside Stockholm. A color explosion and energy kick inside-out by
Tham & Videgård Arkitekter. I’ve followed this project with great interest as it’s unusual with this kind of preschool buildings.

I met up with Cecilia Hjelm, preschool chief, and she gave me a tour, something she’s quite used to. The building arouses much interest, mostly from architects that visit Paletten in study purpuse.

The sections are color coded – pink, green and blue with yellow windows. When I’m there children run freely in the joint central room, in between draperies that create new rooms in the room. I follow one girl through one of the doors that leads to one of the private rooms. Each group has their own. I can’t help reflect on what relationship to color and space this girl will grow up to have.

In the latest issue of Arkitektur, a journalist made a review of Paletten, which I felt got lost as the sentence of; 
 …”Color is an inexpensive way to achieve strong effects, but when the walls are curved and the inner wall undulates in a different direction, while the windows jump up and down, together with all the children, toys, artwork, etc. it becomes a bit much of everything.”
(…”Färg är ett billigt sätt att uppnå starka effekter men när ytterväggar är svängda och innerväggarna böljar åt ett annat håll, samtidigt som fönsterställningen hoppar upp och ner, ihop med alla dagisbarn, leksaker, teckningar osv blir det lite mycket av allt.”)

I would like to celebrate that the architects dared to stretch the limits for what is expected and letting pedagogical ideas form the shape together with their love for color. Not only does the pedagogues go to work with a smile on their face, Cecilia also told me she’s never in her 30 years-something preschool worklife worked at a place where there has been so little conflicts among both workers and children.! 

This is what it’s all about really – creating environments for people to enjoy and feel good in, supporting the activity the object or house is created for – and should more often take part of the debates and discussions. In this case the curved walls creates – together with the materials – a pleasant sound environment that decreases stress on the children and encourage movement. The changing window heights creates a diversity in the outside scenes and views for the children. And the children, well they unconditionally belong there together with their toys and artwork. 

 Read more about Paletten at the architects website and here.
We were at Kasper’s place in Malmö this weekend and had a great design and inspiration weekend for upcoming work. Malmö Konsthall was a sure stop.  The playground outside the art gallery was also something beyond the ordinary with its spiral-shaped climbing structures. 

We were at Kasper’s place in Malmö this weekend and had a great design and inspiration weekend for upcoming work. Malmö Konsthall was a sure stop.  The playground outside the art gallery was also something beyond the ordinary with its spiral-shaped climbing structures. 

Photos: Katsuhisa Kida
Breaking rules.When we first started to work with design for pedagogical environments it was obvious that it wasn’t just the interior that lacked inspiration and playfulness but most often the whole building and environment. 
Sadly not much has happened on the design or architecture front since the 70’s on this area. A majority of the preschool’s are still standard barack solutions, which bears traces from the time when they were a solution of storage and nursery of children when women were to be passed out to working life. But new tendences are seen and new visions on how these buildings should be designed emerge. All of the sudden it seems like a preschool is the new prestige work for architects, often built on pedagogical ideas inspired from Reggio Emilia or Montessori. And of course children must be the best users of architecture, as they explore space with their whole body’s and experience with all the senses; moving around, crawling on the ground, climbing on walls, running - playing. It makes me so happy to see new examples, that will bring the development forward and set a new standard for how we view preschool’s as pedagogical spaces for development, challenges and play. Showing you images of Fuji Kindergarten outside Tokyo, a house without dead ends, by Tezuka Architects. Look at that roof! What a thrill it must be to be able to run free up there, and climbing trees that burst through the house. A house that really breaks the rules of conventional ideas. You can listen to an audio review of this house at Monocle.

Photos: Katsuhisa Kida

Breaking rules.

When we first started to work with design for pedagogical environments it was obvious that it wasn’t just the interior that lacked inspiration and playfulness but most often the whole building and environment. 


Sadly not much has happened on the design or architecture front since the 70’s on this area. A majority of the preschool’s are still standard barack solutions, which bears traces from the time when they were a solution of storage and nursery of children when women were to be passed out to working life. But new tendences are seen and new visions on how these buildings should be designed emerge. All of the sudden it seems like a preschool is the new prestige work for architects, often built on pedagogical ideas inspired from Reggio Emilia or Montessori. And of course children must be the best users of architecture, as they explore space with their whole body’s and experience with all the senses; moving around, crawling on the ground, climbing on walls, running - playing. 

It makes me so happy to see new examples, that will bring the development forward and set a new standard for how we view preschool’s as pedagogical spaces for development, challenges and play. Showing you images of Fuji Kindergarten outside Tokyo, a house without dead ends, by Tezuka Architects. Look at that roof! What a thrill it must be to be able to run free up there, and climbing trees that burst through the house. A house that really breaks the rules of conventional ideas. 

You can listen to an audio review of this house at Monocle.


A lot of exciting things are happenning right now for us, will keep you posted and tell you more later. But one of them is the world touring exhibition about Swedish design for children -Swedish Seeds. For all of you living in or close to Washington, USA, I can recommend a visit to the Swedish embassy where it’s now showing. There you can learn some Swedish words, play on our flower play mat Dream Big and look at other smart design’s from our country.

A lot of exciting things are happenning right now for us, will keep you posted and tell you more later. But one of them is the world touring exhibition about Swedish design for children -Swedish Seeds. For all of you living in or close to Washington, USA, I can recommend a visit to the Swedish embassy where it’s now showing. There you can learn some Swedish words, play on our flower play mat Dream Big and look at other smart design’s from our country.